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10 Nov

DES MOINES, Iowa -- Kate Lay had always been skeptical of love at first sight. She’s a surgical nurse who was born and raised in Iowa. They married, bought a house, and started life on their terms. He explained that the week prior he’d lost his job as a result of his drug use. Kate didn’t realize when she looked into her husband’s eyes he was reliving the explosions that literally rattled his brain, the gunfire, the atrocities, the deaths of his three comrades. “It drives you to want to take your head through the wall. It stirs up so much emotion in a short period of time and it can come on from anything…

But she says practicality flew out the window the first time she laid eyes on the man she would eventually marry. She said Brandon’s job as a delivery driver wasn’t fulfilling his ambitious dreams of traveling the world and helping people. Still, she never dreamed that one day he would disappear. Kate explained, “Not a single person knew what was going on.” Brandon had become addicted to crystal meth. At that moment, Kate realized, “I don’t know this person that I’m living with.” Brandon was the only person who knew. He explained, “Life and death situations were real to me every day. so, to me, drugs was just like, ‘Well, I’ll give it a shot,’” said Brandon.

Amy asks “I fell in love with a wonderful, a younger man (yea for me) and then, he was called to active duty. I may as well have been a wet towel or his mother, the way he treated me. I was told later that this is ‘normal’ for soldiers, and because reintegrating is hard. just knowing I’m there as I was throughout the war.

DES MOINES, Iowa -- Kate Lay had always been skeptical of love at first sight. She’s a surgical nurse who was born and raised in Iowa. They married, bought a house, and started life on their terms. He explained that the week prior he’d lost his job as a result of his drug use. Kate didn’t realize when she looked into her husband’s eyes he was reliving the explosions that literally rattled his brain, the gunfire, the atrocities, the deaths of his three comrades. “It drives you to want to take your head through the wall. It stirs up so much emotion in a short period of time and it can come on from anything… But she says practicality flew out the window the first time she laid eyes on the man she would eventually marry. She said Brandon’s job as a delivery driver wasn’t fulfilling his ambitious dreams of traveling the world and helping people. Still, she never dreamed that one day he would disappear. Kate explained, “Not a single person knew what was going on.” Brandon had become addicted to crystal meth. At that moment, Kate realized, “I don’t know this person that I’m living with.” Brandon was the only person who knew. He explained, “Life and death situations were real to me every day. so, to me, drugs was just like, ‘Well, I’ll give it a shot,’” said Brandon. Amy asks “I fell in love with a wonderful, a younger man (yea for me) and then, he was called to active duty. I may as well have been a wet towel or his mother, the way he treated me. I was told later that this is ‘normal’ for soldiers, and because reintegrating is hard. just knowing I’m there as I was throughout the war. $1,000 of care packages and plane tickets and prayers later, I KNOW I did, and he will tell you that too. Only a woman who believes that a guy won’t appreciate what she is, will focus her efforts elsewhere. The thought of also knowing someone not only military but going to war was beyond my comprehension. it’s tough to wait for someone for 15 months, and to hear of bombs, friends dying etc in his letters. At this point, when he came home last December, he was not a well puppy, though he would like us to think different. He came home – both of us anticipating seeing each other – but then completely let down by experience. but I couldn’t find a balance between what was love and what was him needing someone there.. I know he feels a bond with me as many war vets do with those who helped them stay alive, and that I did, I know I did. But my needs are not getting met and I hate how he treats me now. You are trying to fix, heal, buy, help…so many things with this guy.asked military veterans to send us their stories of life after war— their experiences returning home and seeking health care and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. In the past week, we've heard from not only veterans, but also from family members of veterans, both living and deceased; from doctors who work with the VA; from journalists who've covered the VA; and from various contractors and private citizens who deal with the VA in various capacities.With all of their input in mind, we'd like to make two points about what we're trying to do:1) The much-discussed backlog of disability claims at the VA— about benefits claims, and the resources that we choose to dedicate to processing claims. They helped to launch a new project that recruits men and women who have been to battle. She said, “The current rate is 22 vet suicides per day.

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DES MOINES, Iowa -- Kate Lay had always been skeptical of love at first sight. She’s a surgical nurse who was born and raised in Iowa. They married, bought a house, and started life on their terms. He explained that the week prior he’d lost his job as a result of his drug use. Kate didn’t realize when she looked into her husband’s eyes he was reliving the explosions that literally rattled his brain, the gunfire, the atrocities, the deaths of his three comrades. “It drives you to want to take your head through the wall. It stirs up so much emotion in a short period of time and it can come on from anything…

But she says practicality flew out the window the first time she laid eyes on the man she would eventually marry. She said Brandon’s job as a delivery driver wasn’t fulfilling his ambitious dreams of traveling the world and helping people. Still, she never dreamed that one day he would disappear. Kate explained, “Not a single person knew what was going on.” Brandon had become addicted to crystal meth. At that moment, Kate realized, “I don’t know this person that I’m living with.” Brandon was the only person who knew. He explained, “Life and death situations were real to me every day. so, to me, drugs was just like, ‘Well, I’ll give it a shot,’” said Brandon.

Amy asks “I fell in love with a wonderful, a younger man (yea for me) and then, he was called to active duty. I may as well have been a wet towel or his mother, the way he treated me. I was told later that this is ‘normal’ for soldiers, and because reintegrating is hard. just knowing I’m there as I was throughout the war. $1,000 of care packages and plane tickets and prayers later, I KNOW I did, and he will tell you that too. Only a woman who believes that a guy won’t appreciate what she is, will focus her efforts elsewhere.

The thought of also knowing someone not only military but going to war was beyond my comprehension. it’s tough to wait for someone for 15 months, and to hear of bombs, friends dying etc in his letters. At this point, when he came home last December, he was not a well puppy, though he would like us to think different. He came home – both of us anticipating seeing each other – but then completely let down by experience. but I couldn’t find a balance between what was love and what was him needing someone there.. I know he feels a bond with me as many war vets do with those who helped them stay alive, and that I did, I know I did. But my needs are not getting met and I hate how he treats me now. You are trying to fix, heal, buy, help…so many things with this guy.

asked military veterans to send us their stories of life after war— their experiences returning home and seeking health care and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. In the past week, we've heard from not only veterans, but also from family members of veterans, both living and deceased; from doctors who work with the VA; from journalists who've covered the VA; and from various contractors and private citizens who deal with the VA in various capacities.

With all of their input in mind, we'd like to make two points about what we're trying to do:1) The much-discussed backlog of disability claims at the VA— about benefits claims, and the resources that we choose to dedicate to processing claims.

They helped to launch a new project that recruits men and women who have been to battle. She said, “The current rate is 22 vet suicides per day.

But it’s gotta be done." Brandon is completing training for his new career as a Project Cohort guide. After PTSD led to drug use that nearly cost her marriage, Kate decided the most practical thing to do would be to take on Brandon’s mission as a team.

,000 of care packages and plane tickets and prayers later, I KNOW I did, and he will tell you that too. Only a woman who believes that a guy won’t appreciate what she is, will focus her efforts elsewhere.

The thought of also knowing someone not only military but going to war was beyond my comprehension. it’s tough to wait for someone for 15 months, and to hear of bombs, friends dying etc in his letters. At this point, when he came home last December, he was not a well puppy, though he would like us to think different. He came home – both of us anticipating seeing each other – but then completely let down by experience. but I couldn’t find a balance between what was love and what was him needing someone there.. I know he feels a bond with me as many war vets do with those who helped them stay alive, and that I did, I know I did. But my needs are not getting met and I hate how he treats me now. You are trying to fix, heal, buy, help…so many things with this guy.

asked military veterans to send us their stories of life after war— their experiences returning home and seeking health care and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. In the past week, we've heard from not only veterans, but also from family members of veterans, both living and deceased; from doctors who work with the VA; from journalists who've covered the VA; and from various contractors and private citizens who deal with the VA in various capacities.

With all of their input in mind, we'd like to make two points about what we're trying to do:1) The much-discussed backlog of disability claims at the VA— about benefits claims, and the resources that we choose to dedicate to processing claims.

They helped to launch a new project that recruits men and women who have been to battle. She said, “The current rate is 22 vet suicides per day.

But it’s gotta be done." Brandon is completing training for his new career as a Project Cohort guide. After PTSD led to drug use that nearly cost her marriage, Kate decided the most practical thing to do would be to take on Brandon’s mission as a team.

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“Essentially you had a life together, you’re in a straight line when you leave and then you veer off in different directions. “We’re really hard on each other, just like brothers and sisters are.Doctors and other medical professionals who work for the VA are not the source of this problem.(To be fair, we've also heard from people who've worked processing VA benefits claims, who allege that vets often try to rip off the government for benefits.By the following Monday, he was checked into a mental hospital.His struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury were ravaging their marriage.